Book analysis lord of the rings

Because of the difficulty Bilbo has in giving the ring away, his friend the wizard Gandalf the Grey suspects that the ring is more than it appears. Some years later, Gandalf reveals to Frodo that the ring is in fact the One Ring, forged by Sauron the Dark Lord thousands of years before to enable him to dominate and enslave all of Middle-earth. Despite the danger and hopelessness of the quest, Frodo accepts the burden and resolves to take the Ring to the safety of the elven stronghold of Rivendell. Frodo sets off with three companions, fellow hobbits Merry, Pippin, and Sam.

Book analysis lord of the rings

At half a million words, balancing scores of main characters and hundreds of minor ones the index lists more than seven hundred personal names and interweaving several plot strands, The Lord of the Rings was too big for one volume in its first publication, resulting in a three-volume version that was inaccurately dubbed a trilogy.

The setting is Middle-earth, conceived vaguely as Northern Europe before the recorded history of humankind and before geological forces changed the shape of the land. The story opens with a party at which Bilbo hands over his estate to his nephew and leaves the Shire for good.

With his estate, Bilbo leaves Frodo the magic ring that makes the wearer invisible. As Frodo receives it, however, the wizard Gandalf discovers this and reveals to Frodo, that the ring is in reality the One Ring that controls a host of other rings of power dispersed among the races of Middle-earth three to the elves, seven to the dwarves, and nine to humans.

Sauron, a mysterious power who has sought for millennia to control all people, now seeks the ring from his stronghold in Mordor. Holding the ring endangers Frodo and all around him: He must leave the Shire he loves. Pursued by the shadowy Black Riders—cloaked figures so shadowy that they seem to have no substance—the four hobbits are trapped between the Riders, menacing Barrow Wights, and malicious willows that enclose the hobbits until the kindly Tom Bombadil rescues them.

Moving on, the hobbits seem lost without Gandalf until they fall in with a scruffy character, a Ranger named Strider, who looks disreputable, but whom Frodo decides to trust.

Strider fends off the Black Riders, but not before Frodo is wounded by a Morgul Blade, a magic sword whose wound can be cured only by elvish healing.

Recovering at Rivendell, Frodo is called to a council where the greatest minds—elf, dwarf, human, hobbit, and wizard—debate how to answer the threat of the ring.

The inescapable conclusion is that the ring must be destroyed in the fires of Mount Doom, in the heart of Mordor where the evil power resides. Frodo agrees to the dangerous mission, supported by the Fellowship of the Ring: The entire section is 1, words.Free online book notes, study guides of over books and a list of cliff notes and literature help.

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The narrator of the Lord of the Rings is never a character in its own right (though we do hear a lot of stories from the different characters' perspectives within dialogue). The first installment of the epic Lord of the Rings Trilogy was first published in Since that time, the world of Middle-Earth has fascinated readers and transformed lives.

Book analysis lord of the rings

Today, I desire to delve into this incredible story, and share with you how Tolkien’s enduring faith is expressed in his novels. The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers by J.R.R. Tolkien The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by J.

R. R. Tolkien, later fitted as a trilogy. The story began as a sequel to Tolkien's earlier fantasy book The Hobbit and soon developed into a much larger story. Well over a thousand pages long, filled with snatches of poetry and untranslated imaginary languages, saturated with intense description and historical detail, J.R.R.

Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings stands as a unique achievement in twentieth-century literature. Aside from its intrinsic. The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by J.

R. R. Tolkien, which was later fitted as a trilogy. The story began as a sequel to Tolkien's earlier fantasy book The Hobbit and soon developed into a much larger story. It was written in stages between and , with much of.

Analysis of Sam as the Hero in “Lord of the Rings” (An Essay)